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Distracted Driving Continues Taking Horrific Toll, In More Ways Than You May Think
Grewal Law, PLLC
(888) 211-5798

Ending preventable injuries and deaths caused by distracted driving has been a mission for the attorneys at Grewal Law for the past decade.  And while a lot of progress has been made, there is still a lot of work to do.

Distracted driving occurs whenever a motorist takes his or her eyes off the road, hands off the wheel, or mind off the complicated task of driving.  There are plenty of causes of distracted driving – eating food, adjusting the radio, daydreaming, etc. – but cell phones and mobile technology have made a bad problem worse.  Law enforcement, mobile companies, and car manufacturers are taking steps to reduce distracted driving caused by cell phones, but results are mixed and thousands of people still die every year.

Tragic and preventable loss of life is bad enough, but the cost does not stop there.  The total financial cost of motor vehicle crash deaths, factoring in medical expenses and lost work, runs into the tens of BILLIONS of dollars each year.  In 2018, the CDC estimates the cost nationwide was about $55 Billion.  And this says nothing about serious injuries or the emotional and psychological toll of motor vehicle crashes.

Preventing deaths and serious injuries on our roadways is a complicated task.  Surprisingly, even though traffic volumes were down during the first half of 2020 due to the novel coronavirus pandemic, the rate of traffic deaths actually increased, most likely due to poor driving behaviors.  Which brings us to the key point – traffic safety comes down to motorists making good decisions.  With that in mind, put down the phone, keep your eyes on the road, and drive safely.

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