The Legal Examiner Affiliate Network The Legal Examiner The Legal Examiner The Legal Examiner search feed instagram google-plus avvo phone envelope checkmark mail-reply spinner error close
Skip to main content

Young adults planning to attend their first year of university, which usually includes life in a residence hall, should consider asking their health care provider about the Meningitis vaccine.  The CDC notes that this population of adults, living in close proximity, is as much as three (3) times more likely to contract Meningitis and recommends the Meningitis Vaccine specifically for this group. https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/vpd/mening/public/index.html This is good health advice given that there have been Meningitis outbreaks across the United States on university and college campuses over the years.  

There are many different strains of Meningitis, which is a potentially deadly disease process.  As many as 10% to 15% of all individuals who contract this disease – which involves the inflammation of the covering around the brain and spinal cord or septicemia – end up passing away.  Nearly 20% of all individuals who contract Meningitis end up with long-term health effects, including varying degrees of brain damage and/or paralysis.  Prompt diagnosis and immediate medical treatment is associated with a better outcome. https://www.cdc.gov/meningitis/lab-manual/chpt02-epi.html 

Most children in the United States, who have had primary pediatric care have been vaccinated against meningitis types: A, C, W & Y in their teen years.  As of 2014, there is now a vaccination available for Meningitis type B as well.  If you are heading off to a college dorm, you may want to consider exploring your Meningitis vaccination status with a healthcare provider.  

Meningitis B information 

Comments for this article are closed, but you may still contact the author privately.