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Iowa Teen With Cerebral Palsy Named Homecoming Queen

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Iowa Teen With Cerebral Palsy Named Homecoming Queen

Having had the honor of representing so many amazing children afflicted with Cerebral Palsy to greater and lesser degrees, it is heart warming to see one young lady achieve her wish of becoming homecoming queen.  Courtney Tharp of Waverly, Iowa was voted homecoming queen by her classmates and serves as an inspiration to everyone, including her principal and teachers.

Cerebral Palsy, a Neurological Disorder

Cerebral Palsy is a a group of disorders that involves nervous system and brain functions.  It can affect speech, movement, learning, hearing, seeing and thinking.  There are several types of CP, including spastic, dyskinetic, ataxic, hypotonic and mixed.  Courtney was diagnosed with CP when she was just nine months old and she has difficulty with her speech and movement.  She is the only child of her parents, and they were a little uncertain about the student body’s genuineness in electing their daughter homecoming queen.  But school officials were quick to reassure them that their daughter is truly an amazing person in the eyes of her classmates and that they most certainly were sincere in their actions.

Teen Represents School Spirit, Delights in Crown

Courtney was stunned when she was announced homecoming queen candidate, but quickly lit up and began to high five her classmates.  When she won the crown, her face streamed with tears.  The associate principal of the school, Jeremy Langner, said that Courtney embodies the school community, with a love of learning, and high school spirit.  Her king, Kaleb Staack also stated that he couldn’t have asked for a better queen.   In my experience working with individuals with CP, so many are so special in the way that they appreciate their opportunities.  They don’t worry as much about what they don’t have and this lesson would be good for everyone. Remember, don’t focus on what you don’t have or think you’ve lost, but be grateful for your blesssings!