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New Jersey CVS Prescription Error Leads to Infant Overdose of Cough Syrup

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CVS has had its share of problems lately. In fact, I’ve written about outdated products still on shelves at stores in Connecticut and New York. Luckily, both attorney generals for those states filed suit against the pharmacy and CVS has already settled with NY AG, Andrew Cuomo, for $875,000. However, there appears to be more problems with CVS stores on the East Coast, but not the same problems as before.

Angela Trowbridge bought her infant son, Jayden Trowbridge, his prescription cough syrup at a Roselle, New Jersey CVS and administered it to the 8-month old baby as the label instructed. However, when Jayden refused to sleep for four days straight and acted jittery and anxious, Angela began to suspect something was wrong. In fact there was something terribly wrong–Jayden, who weight 19 pounds, was taking the amount of medication appropriate for an 120-pound adult.

According to a New Jersey newstation that covered the story, the original prescription document that CVS received from Jayden’s pediatrician had the right dosage. Specifically, the doctor’s scrip instructed Angela to give Jayden 1/4 of a teaspoon every 12 hours. Instead, the pharmacy’s label on the syrup instructed a dosage of 1 full teaspoon every 12 hours. Nevertheless, the CVS pharmacist claims that he simply filled the prescription as it was called in. Angela is extremely concerned that Jayden may have permanent damage and has demanded answers from CVS.

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  1. Pharmaciststeve says:
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    As a practicing Pharmacist – not employed by CVS – docs offices are notorious for having “assistants” calling in Rxs and putting them on the IVR (voice mail) and rattling off the information. I often have to listen to a left message 4-5 times to help assure that I get it right. One store I worked in… a local doc’s assistant calling in Rxs on the IVR.. had a serious stutter problem. IVR prohibits a “read back” or clarification of what was verbally said. Between the IVR and sloppy precriber’s handwriting.. imo… people’s life are put at risk daily